Archive | RC Surf Fishing RSS feed for this section

Remote Control Fishing Boat-Big Fish Most Fish Video Reward Challange!

17 Aug

By now there’s thousands of fishermen out there catching fish with The RC Fishing Pole and we want to see your biggest fish caught with a Fish Fun Co. Product. We’ve heard stories of massive Muskies, Stripers, Bass caught, here’s a chance to post that big fish video and qualify for a $100 dollar prize! Use The RC Fishing Pole an any Rc Boat or use your Radio Ranger, Bass Pro or LuckyStrike! The rules are simple, Big Fish using the Line Release, or Most Fish Pulling in With The Boat, (any size fish). $100 for each winning video posted. Fish Fun Co. is going to run this promotion for 90 days, so get your video in by the end of November! Upload it to Youtube, or email or send it to Fish Fun Co.

* Show the boat going out
*Metion RcFishingWorld.com
*Show the fish Being caught
Additional Item-Please make the video interesting as possible!

Http://RcFishingWorld.com Big Remote Control Fishing Contest!

Http://RcFishingWorld.com Big Remote Control Fishing Contest!

The RC (remote control) Surf Fishing Boat-Shark Specialists

7 Jan Rc Fishing isn't only for hobbyists
Rc Fishing isn't only for hobbyists

The Radio Ranger RC Fishing Boat!

The sea was calm, the day was hot and the wiry little man stalking  down the beach with a big rod under one arm and a little boat under  the other looked for all the world like a demented angler who had  given up fishing for towing toy boats through the surf on the end of  his fishing line.  But looks are deceiving. The angler was Herb Goodman of Lake  Worth, Florida, a remarkably dedicated shark fishem1an. Herb was  no stranger to Boynton Beach that Sunday afternoon in mid-July.  And the boat under his arm was no plaything. It was an ingenious  device he built for launching baits, specifically shark baits in the two to five-pound category.  The craft was thirty-six inches overall. Outriggers contained two  six-volt Ray-0-Vac batteries for powering two small motors originally designed for bailing out a boat. Propulsion was by aluminum  paddle wheels, one on each side of the hull. Inside the miniature vessel  was an electronic guidance system that could be activated by a  compact wireless transmitter from shore.  Herb propped his fiberglass Harnell rod and 12/o Penn reel on shore, scooping a hole in the sand for the rod butt and bracing the  reel with a slab of driftwood. He put the reel on clicker and paid out  his 130-pound-test dacron line to the water's edge. At the end of the  line was fiftteen feet of flexible cable terminating in two 12-o Sobey  hooks, both firmly skewered into the bow and stern of a whole bonito  weighing about seven pounds. If the belly of the bonito seemed to  have an unnatural bulge it was because Herb had inserted half a sash  weight, which would later hold the bait down. When everything was  ready, Herb waded the boat and bonito just out beyond the riffling  surf, loaded the bait aboard and set the craft adrift.  On shore he flipped the switch of the small transmitter and the  boat's paddle wheels began churning. Slowly it moved out into deeper  water, throwing up a small wake and towing the heavy leader and line  behind it. The 12/o chattered evenly and the dacron moved out  through the guides.  Minutes later Herb squinted toward the tiny vessel that was now  barely a white speck some three hundred yards from shore.  "That should do it," he said, and threw the reel in gear.  Line stopped. The bait dragged off the stem into the water.  Herb manipulated the transmitter again and the craft executed a  right turn and headed back toward the beach.  "Can't use the boat all the time," Herb told me as he snapped  his reel out of gear and dropped down on the sand beside it. "When  there's waves it doesn't work right. Can't keep it on course. Takes  calm days like this, then she goes perfect." He peered out at the  little boat homing in on us. "Now all we got to do is wait and see  what happens," he said, smiling.  Things have been happening to Herb Goodman at Boynton  Beach Inlet every Sunday for longer than he cares to remember. They  all concern sharks, and the only thing that. occasionally breaks up  the routine is a giant ray. His most recent conquest was a nose-to-tail-tip fourteen-foot specimen that put up a two-hour battle and  weighed about a thousand pounds.  The fact is he likes it. lie likes the challenge, the excitement, the rough-and-tumble fight and the crowd ~attracts-the people who can't quite believe what they see this spunky little man in a natty straw hat haul out of the ocean on a Sunday afternoon. He doesn't have a fancy boat, nor do his catches have the revered reputations of sailfish or marlin. But no one who has ever setn him in action will ever doubt that Herb Goodman's sport isn't big-game fishing in all its glory.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,382 other followers

%d bloggers like this: